The following is a preliminary outline for communities, neighborhoods and schools. - Feel free to edit or embellish your own version for your own neighborhoods or village councils, et al..:

Simple truths we can quickly assess; and determine common concerns and common goals:

“If we are like the majority of people on Earth right now, then our Community, along with our State and National Economic, Ecological and Social Structures are failing. I think we all should understand that there are no federal; no state, nor other mechanisms in place that will solve these problems for us. – And they are not in the works. We can sign petitions, make donations, and support conscientious producers, service providers, retailers and organizations. – These are all good things. But the biggest impact we can have comes from our actions at home in our communities. Communities have much more latitude to make the commitment to changing from a degenerative trajectory to a regenerative one. If there is to be leadership; if help is on the way, this is where it is coming from.” – E. M.

For Any Community that is Willing:

Outline for Creating and /or Expanding Local Regenerative Infrastructure:

To Establish an Integrated Community Farming System:

1. Gather a team consisting of, but not limited to: Soil and Water Conservationists, An Arborist, Horticulturist, a Master Gardener, a Farmer, a Carpenter, a Project Coordinator, and two Documentarians to track all expenses and film for ongoing learning.

2. Assess the community resources and layout from aerial photographs and members of the community. Initiate some soil and water testing.

3: In a Cooperative Problem Solving Experiment with the community; develop a flexible plan for the types of plants and projects best suited for the community layout, soil and water conditions. (Emphasizing “Ergonomics” (conserving energy and resources at every juncture) General: Residents grow an agreed upon assortment of crops as well as trees, prairie grasses, rain gardens etc… to establish and maintain a complete and highly productive, stable ecosystem.  

New Curriculum for Schools and Districts : All under the heading: Regenerative Infrastructure:

1. CPSE: Cooperative Problem Solving Experiments: A methodology facilitating honest and responsible communication; enabling common understanding; assessments and cooperative proposals for anything. - An essential tool for designing and implementing Regenerative Infrastructure.  

{Some suggested topics for CPSE: “Demystifying and Defining Terms associated with”:}

A: “Economics” B. “Educational Priorities” C: “Climate Change” D: “Politics and Ideologies”

2. Integrated Community Farming Systems:

A: Soil and Water Conservation: Soil and water testing, conservation, restoration and regeneration.

B: Gardening / Farming: Indoor and outdoor productivity. Suggested crop and animal emphasis: Composting, Vermicomposting, Microgreens, Assorted Vegetables, Chickens, Goats… (Produce can be consumed at the school cafeterias, etc…)

C: Aquaponics Lab: High Efficiency 12-month fish farming and hydroponics. Can be completely off-grid; using solar panels for the water pumps and compost for heat. (May begin as a 12-month hydroponics lab and add the fish farming later)

D. Ergonomics and Cooperative Project Management: Energy and Resource Conservation. Waste Reduction and Maximized Productivity. Project Management: Nuanced work scheduling, minimizing transportation fuel requirements. (But above all: Don’t let perfection become the enemy of ‘progress’. - Nothing gets done unless people are motivated and show up…)

E. Complete Eco-Systems and Bee Keeping: Bee Keeping and understanding how diversified small farms; along with a complete community eco system are all essential for maximum productivity and sustainability.

F. Trees, Fruits and Nuts: Planting, pruning and maintenance, harvesting; and introduction to Forestry and Arborist Classifications.

G. Canning and Food Preservation: Canning and other techniques for extending the productivity beyond the growing season.

H. Harvesting Trees: Harvesting Local trees for building materials, mulch and fuel. With some emphasis on harvesting EAB Ash (in Illinois)

J. Cotton and Hemp: Taking the step beyond food production: For example, hemp can be grown for fibers to make clothes, rugs, bags, paper, rope, also cooking oil and nutritional supplements. - Can be grown in soil not yet suitable for edible plants; helps to detoxify the soil for future food production.

K. Energy Inspection and Cost Savings: Basic techniques for conducting informal energy inspections; and cost effective measures for homes, buildings and outdoor lighting. – And an introduction into Building Sciences and formal energy inspections. (“Energy Raters” are the current state of the art Energy Inspectors)

L: Passive and Active Renewable Energy: Introduction to passive solar and passive geothermal design; as well as active systems for heating water and electricity generation.

M. What Next?: Cooperative Problem Solving Experiments exploring how to go ‘beyond’ any current practice. Could derive from past methods or from something not yet discovered…

The following is a preliminary outline for communities, neighborhoods and schools. - Feel free to edit or embellish your own version for your own neighborhoods or village councils, et al..:

Simple truths we can quickly assess; and determine common concerns and common goals:

“If we are like the majority of people on Earth right now, then our Community, along with our State and National Economic, Ecological and Social Structures are failing. I think we all should understand that there are no federal; no state, nor other mechanisms in place that will solve these problems for us. – And they are not in the works. We can sign petitions, make donations, and support conscientious producers, service providers, retailers and organizations. – These are all good things. But the biggest impact we can have comes from our actions at home in our communities. Communities have much more latitude to make the commitment to changing from a degenerative trajectory to a regenerative one. If there is to be leadership; if help is on the way, this is where it is coming from.” – E. M.

For Any Community that is Willing:

Outline for Creating and /or Expanding Local Regenerative Infrastructure:

To Establish an Integrated Community Farming System:

1. Gather a team consisting of, but not limited to: Soil and Water Conservationists, An Arborist, Horticulturist, a Master Gardener, a Farmer, a Carpenter, a Project Coordinator, and two Documentarians to track all expenses and film for ongoing learning.

2. Assess the community resources and layout from aerial photographs and members of the community. Initiate some soil and water testing.

3: In a Cooperative Problem Solving Experiment with the community; develop a flexible plan for the types of plants and projects best suited for the community layout, soil and water conditions. (Emphasizing “Ergonomics” (conserving energy and resources at every juncture) General: Residents grow an agreed upon assortment of crops as well as trees, prairie grasses, rain gardens etc… to establish and maintain a complete and highly productive, stable ecosystem.  

New Curriculum for Schools and Districts : All under the heading: Regenerative Infrastructure:

1. CPSE: Cooperative Problem Solving Experiments: A methodology facilitating honest and responsible communication; enabling common understanding; assessments and cooperative proposals for anything. - An essential tool for designing and implementing Regenerative Infrastructure.  

{Some suggested topics for CPSE: “Demystifying and Defining Terms associated with”:}

A: “Economics” B. “Educational Priorities” C: “Climate Change” D: “Politics and Ideologies”

2. Integrated Community Farming Systems:

A: Soil and Water Conservation: Soil and water testing, conservation, restoration and regeneration.

B: Gardening / Farming: Indoor and outdoor productivity. Suggested crop and animal emphasis: Composting, Vermicomposting, Microgreens, Assorted Vegetables, Chickens, Goats… (Produce can be consumed at the school cafeterias, etc…)

C: Aquaponics Lab: High Efficiency 12-month fish farming and hydroponics. Can be completely off-grid; using solar panels for the water pumps and compost for heat. (May begin as a 12-month hydroponics lab and add the fish farming later)

D. Ergonomics and Cooperative Project Management: Energy and Resource Conservation. Waste Reduction and Maximized Productivity. Project Management: Nuanced work scheduling, minimizing transportation fuel requirements. (But above all: Don’t let perfection become the enemy of ‘progress’. - Nothing gets done unless people are motivated and show up…)

E. Complete Eco-Systems and Bee Keeping: Bee Keeping and understanding how diversified small farms; along with a complete community eco system are all essential for maximum productivity and sustainability.

F. Trees, Fruits and Nuts: Planting, pruning and maintenance, harvesting; and introduction to Forestry and Arborist Classifications.

G. Canning and Food Preservation: Canning and other techniques for extending the productivity beyond the growing season.

H. Harvesting Trees: Harvesting Local trees for building materials, mulch and fuel. With some emphasis on harvesting EAB Ash (in Illinois)

J. Cotton and Hemp: Taking the step beyond food production: For example, hemp can be grown for fibers to make clothes, rugs, bags, paper, rope, also cooking oil and nutritional supplements. - Can be grown in soil not yet suitable for edible plants; helps to detoxify the soil for future food production.

K. Energy Inspection and Cost Savings: Basic techniques for conducting informal energy inspections; and cost effective measures for homes, buildings and outdoor lighting. – And an introduction into Building Sciences and formal energy inspections. (“Energy Raters” are the current state of the art Energy Inspectors)

L: Passive and Active Renewable Energy: Introduction to passive solar and passive geothermal design; as well as active systems for heating water and electricity generation.

M. What Next?: Cooperative Problem Solving Experiments exploring how to go ‘beyond’ any current practice. Could derive from past methods or from something not yet discovered…